Aging Well: How You Live Now Determines How You’ll Feel Later

EMBARGOED UNTIL MAY 27, 2016 AT 12:45PM

Monday, May 23, 2016 5:20 pm EDT

Dateline:

Orlando, FL

I hope I die before I get old, sang “The Who” front man Roger Daltrey in the song, “My Generation” in 1965, and 51 years later, that sentiment regarding the indignities of aging still hits home to millions.

Since the beginning of time, people have been obsessed with the process we call aging. And while people are living longer today than in any other time in history, most refer to aging with angst, searching for the latest “miracle” cream, lotion or potion, even acupuncture and anti-aging hypnosis, to help stop aging. However, the experts say the best way to age well, is to live well now.

Endocrinology and Aging or “The Taper,” is one of the many in-depth symposia being offered at the AACE 25th Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress in Orlando, May 25-29. The session’s speakers will discuss their latest research and findings on how endocrine-specific conditions such as diabetes, obesity, sarcopenia or muscle mass, hormone health, and thyroid disorders affect the way we age.

Endocrinologist Peter A. Singer, MD, of Los Angeles is the session’s chair, and will participate in a press briefing with others on Friday, May 27, at 12:45 p.m. at the Annual Meeting’s host hotel, Rosen Shingle Creek Resort Orlando.

For more information, contact the AACE Public and Media Relations Department at (904) 353-7878.

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About the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) represents more than 7,000 endocrinologists in the United States and abroad. AACE is the largest association of clinical endocrinologists in the world. A majority of AACE members are certified in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and concentrate on the treatment of patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders including diabetes, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, growth hormone deficiency, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity. Visit our site at  www.aace.com.

About the American College of Endocrinology (ACE)

The American College of Endocrinology (ACE) is the educational and scientific arm of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). ACE is the leader in advancing the care and prevention of endocrine and metabolic disorders by: providing professional education and reliable public health information; recognizing excellence in education, research and service; promoting clinical research and defining the future of Clinical Endocrinology. For more information, please visit  www.aace.com/college.

Contact:

AACE
Mary Green, 904-353-7878 ext. 163
Asst. Director, Public Relations, Media and Creative
mgreen@aace.com
904-404-4223 (fax)